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Helianthus annuus 'F1 Lemon Cutie'

Pollenless Dwarf Sunflower

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Helianthus annuus 'F1 Lemon Cutie'

Pollenless Dwarf Sunflower
€3.45

Availability: In stock

Packet Size:10 Seeds
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Dwarf sunflowers for small gardens and containers are always in demand and ‘Lemon Cutie’ looks to have everything we need in a dwarf sunflower, it is first dwarf semi-double branching, pollenless sunflower. Not only is it dwarf with multiple branches, but you will never have seen such a stunning and unusual semi-double, lemon coloured Sunflower.

Helianthus annuus 'F1 Lemon Cutie' reaches no more than 60cm (2ft) in height, with its first flower being about 15cm (6in) across. Taking just 55 days from sowing to flowering, after the first flower, the plant branches at every leaf joint, producing a succession of smaller, mainly outward-facing flowers from July to September.
Each flower has a ring of slender lemon yellow petals, surrounding a shorter mass of rolled petals in a richer yellow hue, and all around a honeyed eye. As the flowers develop, the tightly packed petals in the centre lengthen and unroll.

One interesting feature of ‘Lemon Cutie’ is that the flowers produce a great deal of nectar, making the flowers very popular with pollinating insects, but no pollen. So if you cut the flowers for the house there will be no need to clean up pollen that drops on the furniture.
More importantly, some people are allergic to sunflower pollen, so growing ‘Lemon Cutie’ avoids the risk of an allergic reaction.
Lemon Cutie is perfect for urban areas and small gardens, on balconies or in containers and also looks wonderful in larger beds or even in landscaping. With it’s unique plant habit and flower shape, this ‘little cutie’ won’t fail to bring a big smile to your face.


  • Awarded the Fleuroselect Gold Medal
    Fleuroselect, the international organisation for the ornamental plants industry have awarded Helianthus annuus 'F1 Lemon Cutie' the Fleuroselect Gold Medal in 2023. The Gold medal is only awarded to the most innovative varieties and symbolises excellence, in both breeding and beauty. The Fleuroselect judges were impressed with its unique plant habit and flower shape.



Pollenless Sunflowers:
Sunflowers are a hot item, originally considered to be a bit of a fad by florists. The fad never passed, in response to the call by florists and home growers, breeders produced innumerable varieties and developed a number of premium varieties that are fabulous as a cut flower, and most importantly are pollenless.
A regular cut-flower sunflower is beautiful when cut, but as the disc flowers in the centre mature, they drop pollen all over the consumer’s table, followed shortly, by the petals of the flower.
A pollenless variety has sterile disc flowers, so it can produce neither pollen nor seed. Since it doesn’t produce pollen, it never decides that its natural function (seed production) has been fulfilled, and it lasts for two full weeks in the vase. The leaves will yellow and have to be removed, but the flower remains attractive for much longer.


Sowing:
For early flowers, start indoors as early as February or March, or sow directly outdoors in in mid-April through to mid-May.
For continuity, sow a succession of sunflowers every fortnight for six weeks in the early part of the growing season. In a hot summer, each cycle from sowing to blooming will take about 60 days.


Sowing Indoors:
Start indoors as early as February or March, to germinate in about 10 days at 60 to 65°F and plant out in April or May. Use 7.5cm (3in) pots and a good sowing compost. Sow one seed 2.5mm (1in) deep per pot. Water and cover with either polythene or bubble plastic to retain the heat, or place pots on a heated bench or in a propagator with the temperature set at 13°C (55°F).
Remove the covers when the leaves appear. Plant seedlings outside when they are large enough to be handled and the root system is well developed. Add garden compost to the soil if it is heavy or infertile.


Sowing Direct:
Plant outside as early as possible to miss heavy frosts, to germinate in about 1 to 3 weeks, in mid-April through mid-May, after the danger of spring frost is past. Ideally, when the soil temperature has reached 13 to 16°C (55 to 60°F).
Sow the seed 5cm (2in) deep and space 45cm (18in) apart in borders. Give the plants plenty of room, especially for low-growing varieties that will branch out. Make rows about 30 inches apart. For very smaller varieties, plant closer together, around 30cm (12in) apart. You can plant multiple seeds and thin them to the strongest contenders when the plants are 15cm (6in) tall.
Experiment with plantings staggered over 5 to 6 weeks to keep enjoying continuous blooms. Water seedlings regularly and, when growing tall forms, feed sparingly with a liquid fertiliser when 60cm (2ft) high. Beware of slugs when they are still young plants and birds stealing the seeds.


Cultivation:
Once the plant is established, water deeply though infrequently to encourage deep rooting and feed sparingly with a liquid fertiliser. Avoid splashing water or fertiliser solution on the stems or leaves. It may help to build a moat in a circle around the plant about 30 to 45cm (12 to 18in) out. Over-fertilisation can cause stem breakage in the autumn especially if the heads are large.
Tall species and cultivars require support. Bamboo stakes are a good choice for any plant that has a strong, single stem and needs support for a short period of time. Remember to cap the top of the cane with any small rounded object or upturned small pot to avoid any eye injuries.


Harvesting Cut Flowers:
Handle sunflowers gently, although they may appear robust, the petals and more delicate parts may bruise. For the vase, cut the fresh flowers in the morning just after they open, but wait until the sun has dried the dew. Remove leaves that are low on the stem, leaving just two or three higher up, near the flower's face. Place the flowers in a bucket filled with water, and leave them to stand for several hours in a cool room before placing in a vase.
Use a clean knife, a clean vase and a few drops of bleach in the water to keep it fresh. Change the water every few days. Blooms can last up to a fortnight when kept in water.


Harvesting Seed:
To dry sunflower seeds, cut the heads off when they begin to yellow at the back and hang them upside down in a dry location away from rodents and birds. Once dry, rub the seeds off and soak overnight in 4 litres (1 gallon) of water with 1 cup of salt in it.
Dry in a low heat, 120°C (250°F) oven for 4 to 5 hours and store in an airtight container. The black-seeded varieties are mainly for oil and birdseed. The grey and white-striped varieties are for drying and eating.


Origin:
A native of North America, Helianthus annuus is a member of the Asteraceae family. Sunflowers become very popular as a cultivated plant in the 18th century. The plant was initially used as on ornamental but by 1769 literature mentions sunflower cultivated by oil production. Today the sunflower is grown for crops in the Mediterranean, Eastern Europe, Argentina, India and the USA.
Artists throughout history have appreciated the sunflower's unique splendor, and those of the Impressionist era were especially fixated on the flower.


Nomenclature:
The Latin name for Sunflower, Helianthus annuus, is taken from the Greek helios, meaning sun, and anthos, meaning flower. The Sunflower originated from South America and represented the sun to worshiping Aztec people; it was brought to Europe in the late sixteenth century.
The species name annuus was named by Linnaeus, it was the only sunflower known to him that lived for a single season, hence it was called annus which means 'annual', 'yearly' or 'lasting a year'.


Fleuroselect:
Fleuroselect is the international organisation for the ornamental plants industry. Its main activities include the testing, protecting and promoting of new flower varieties. Membership includes breeders, producers and distributors of ornamental varieties. Fleuroselect is run by the members, for the members. A small secretariat operates from the organisational headquarters currently based in Noordwijk, The Netherlands.
In order to support and stimulate the development of new ornamental varieties, Fleuroselect conducts trials of new varieties entered by members on approximately 20 private trial grounds spread across Europe. Both indoor and outdoor trials can be conducted. Through the trials, the newness, the practical use, the quality and the exclusivity of the entries are determined. Genuinely new varieties receive recognition either as Fleuroselect Approved Novelties or Gold Medal winners. The Fleuroselect Gold Medal is awarded to innovative varieties that clearly surpass the limits in breeding and beauty. This symbolises excellence in breeding.
Many awarded varieties are widely supported and distributed by Fleuroselect members. The organisation also promotes the winners by way of press releases and displays at trade fairs and in gardens all over the world. Professional growers and hobby gardeners all over the world recognise the Fleuroselect awards as certificates of exceptional merit.


Additional Information

Additional Information

Packet Size 10 Seeds
Family Asteraceae
Genus Helianthus
Species annuus
Cultivar F1 Lemon Cutie
Common Name Pollenless Dwarf Sunflower
Hardiness Hardy Annual
Flowers lemon yellow with green 'eyes'
Natural Flower Time Midsummer to early autumn
Height to 120cm (to 4ft)
Spacing 40-50cm (16-20in)
Position Full Sun to Partial Shade
Germination 5 to 21 days

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